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Freakonomics online dating profile

What You Don’t Know About Online Dating,Episode Details

 · Mandi, however, is a big fan of Freakonomics Radio. GRZELAK: I listened to the podcast on a Thursday morning on my way to work and it was titled “ What You Don’t Know  · Mar 22, A Freakonomics reader (we’ll call her “Sugar Baby”) is documenting her two-week experiment with online “Sugar Daddy Dating”: “beautiful women post pictures What You Don’t Know About Online Dating. Season 6, Episode 23 On this week’s episode of Freakonomics Radio: an economist’s guide to dating online. PJ Vogt bravely lets us AdFind Your Special Someone Online. Choose the Right Dating Site & Start Now!Whether its instant messaging, video chat, dating games, offline events, or online Date in Your Area · Dating Sites Comparison · Start Dating Online! · Meet Canadian SinglesTypes: All Ages Dating Sites, Senior Dating Sites, Gay Dating Sites ... read more

Now, does that make you nervous? If so, we can help. Coming up on Freakonomics Radio : how to build the best online dating profile ever:. OYER: As an economist, I look at that and I want to suggest the following: that you fill in more detail keeping in mind two ideas that are very important in economics.

Justin WOLFERS: The Internet has turned matching upside down. Now you see all the attributes and then you learn about compatibility later. You fill in your ethnicity, body type, diet, religion, income, astrological sign, the pets you love, or hate. The economist Paul Oyer, the author of Everything I Ever Needed to Know About Economics I Learned From Online Dating , told P.

OYER: As I discuss in the book, people lie all the time online. OYER: Okay, so you might not want to reveal that. VOGT: I mean, kind of, honestly. OYER: That may be true. OYER: In some of the questions it asks you how into deep conversations with your mate, and cuddling, and things like that you are.

I may have made myself seem a bit more accessible in those dimensions than an honest person would say. So Paul Oyer admits he fibbed a little bit.

And if they send the wrong message, it might be better to tone them down a little bit. So… what kind of signals was P. Vogt sending out?

I said I drink socially, which is stretching it a little bit. I probably drink more than socially. It says that I speak English okay. OYER: There you go, exactly. As an economist I look at that and I want to suggest the following: that you fill in more detail keeping in mind two ideas that are very important in economics.

They are statistical discrimination and adverse selection. OYER: No, no. One of them is they like rich men. I think I have a firm idea of the person who is probably going to like me. Can I throw a little economics jargon at you guys? OYER: What you want to remember in your profile is that you want to be very upfront and forthcoming in anything that is what an economist would call a coordination game. In my case, I was very upfront and forthcoming in my profile about the fact that I had a large and badly behaved golden retriever, and the fact that I have two teenaged children.

Because if somebody was against those things, then those were deal breakers. But the beauty of that is you still have plenty of time to learn that.

You have time to experiment, make some mistakes, and then you have A time for the reasons we talk about and B you have this very thick market of available women where you live.

Well, it did. He found his significant other on JDate. Vogt, too. A few weeks after they talked, I asked P. how he changed his OkCupid profile:. VOGT: Generally, the sense that I got from talking to him was that I came off as a flippant alcoholic. So I was trying to diminish that. So I cut, I think, one reference to drinking. What I did … he said I should fill out more of the basic questions about me. VOGT: Yes. He told me to put in a picture of myself more presentable so I took a picture of myself from a wedding ….

DUBNER: Oh yeah. VOGT: Also, I put a picture with my dog, which felt like to the spirit of his advice, and a bunch of old ladies. DUBNER: Oh my god. You are canny! This is actually a perfect mirror, in a way, of the other picture of you at the wedding with four young good looking girls. Now here you are on a park bench — in what looks like Brooklyn — holding a dog. also tweaked his profile a bit, as Paul Oyer suggested. He tried to highlight some of his best attributes….

DUBNER: Look, it is hard for me to say, but I would think if I were a woman and any guy is listing his teeth as an attribute …. So how did it work out for P. In the year since we first released this episode … He met a girl!

On OkCupid! He also now hosts a podcast called Reply All. Which you should listen to, after you finish listening to this. But the strengths of online dating are very real. Justin Wolfers is an economist at the University of Michigan. All my Jewish friends talk about being under pressure from mom to meet a good Jewish boy or girl.

I imagine this is true in other ethnic communities. Freakonomics Radio Network Newsletter Stay up-to-date on all our shows. We promise no spam. Episode Transcript Hey podcast listeners. Mandi GRZELAK: Hello! Tim BARNHART: Hey! Really well. Really, really, really well. BARNHART: Yep. GRZELAK: We have you to thank. BARNHART: Yeah, so thank you. BARNHART: Yeah! So this is when she got crafty. She wrote a fake OkCupid profile. Very, very fake. Stephen J. DUBNER: So you set up a profile and your name is what?

REED: AaronCarterFan. DUBNER: And are you, in fact, an Aaron Carter fan? DUBNER: Why? In the online dating context, an algorithm can get a good idea of my taste in partners by doing a similar comparison of me to other male users. Another male user of the site will have a similar taste in women to me if we are messaging the same women.

However, while this gives the algorithm a good idea of who I like, it leaves out the important factor of who likes me — my attractiveness to the female users of the site, measured by who is sending me messages.

They also divorced at a lower percentage:. The research shows that couples who met online were more likely to have higher marital satisfaction and lower rates of marital breakups than relationships that began in face-to-face meetings.

This is the first time I have ever tried to use it play cupid. I have a close friend here in Chicago. She is in her late twenties. She is really smart. She has an extremely successful career. She is incredibly pretty. Here is a true story. My wife later described her as the most beautiful woman she had ever seen in person. Why, if she is so great, is she still single? Also, I suspect a lot of potential suitors are intimidated by her — I know I would have been.

A man would need to be very self-confident to ask her out. New research by Jochen E. Gebauer and two co-authors, summarized in the BPS Research Digest , analyzed data from a German dating website and found that an unpopular name will lessen your chances of getting a date in the online dating universe:. The main finding here was that people with unfashionable names like Kevin or Chantal were dramatically more likely to be rejected by other users i. other users tended to choose not to contact them.

A user with the most popular name Alexander received on average double the number of contacts as someone with the least popular name Kevin … However, the researchers also found that people with unpopular names were more likely to smoke, had lower self-esteem and were less educated.

Apparently, Kevin really is more than a name. Freakonomics is no stranger to studying prostitution , as discussed in Superfreakonomics. com auctions off dates and claims to be inspired by the charity dating model. Upon a cursory read, the generous users seem to be overwhelmingly male, and the attractive users overwhelmingly female and pictured in bathing suits. Even virtual roses used in Korean online dating experiments.

In a new working paper by main author Soohyung Lee of the University of Maryland , economists studied the impact on preference signaling — signals sent to a select few. In the study, a major online dating company in Korea organized dating events with participants, half men and half women. As a young man I had red, curly, and sometimes, frizzy hair.

I was devastated by his meanness. I consider myself very lucky to have found a woman who will tolerate my red hair. Now, married almost 18 years, a couple months ago I started shaving my head smooth, baby-ass, bald; does it feel good. I wonder if Telly Savalas was a redhead? So how did it work out for PJ? But the strengths of online dating are very real. And I imagine this is true in other ethnic communities. What are your job responsibilities? What do you think is the best contribution your job makes to society?

Also, my birthday is this Thursday and I would love it if you would shout me out on the show! Job responsibilities on the podcast? Basically, Levitt does the numbers, I do the words.

Best contribution we make to society? Are you kidding? Have you ever listened to this podcast? And about your birthday? Happy birthday, Katie Hoezler. And thank you for listening. Freakonomics Radio Network Newsletter Stay up-to-date on all our shows. We promise no spam. So this is when she got crafty. She wrote a fake OkCupid profile. Very, very fake. DUBNER: So you set up a profile, and your name is what? REED: AaronCarterFan. DUBNER: And are you, in fact, an Aaron Carter fan?

DUBNER: Why? DUBNER: Talk about some of your favorite highlights or lowlights of your profile. REED: LOL. Oh yeah. She really enjoys it. DUBNER: Right. DUBNER: So what do you attribute that success to? DUBNER: Uh-huh. And so tell me about following up with some of these replies. DUBNER: And how many dates did you have then out of AaronCarterFan fishing? DUBNER: Really? REED: Yeah. DUBNER: I am so surprised, Alli. REED: Actually, I found that a deal-breaker for me was messaging AaronCarterFan.

DUBNER: Okay. What else? DUBNER: All right. OYER: Hi, how are you? VOGT: Good! Nice to meet you. VOGT: No! VOGT: Very transparent. OYER: Can I just ask the old guy question?

What are torrents? VOGT: It could be that I was really into torrential rain. VOGT: Long walks in the rain. VOGT: Oh boy, B-A-R-T-H-E-S S-I-M-P-S-O-N. This is so mortifying. VOGT: Yeah, option value sounds like a good way to put it. OYER: Right now you should be very patient.

OYER: No, no, go ahead. VOGT: Yeah. VOGT: I mean, do you feel like the software does a good job of that?

Coming up on Freakonomics Radio: how to build the best online dating profile ever: OYER: As an economist I look at that and I want to suggest the following, that you fill in more detail keeping in mind two ideas that are very important in economics.

And, why online dating is a bigger deal than you think: Justin WOLFERS: The Internet has turned matching upside down. VOGT: Oh man. OYER: Yeah, there you go, exactly. VOGT: Huh. VOGT: Okay. VOGT: Wait, so you think that I should have dressed up pictures? VOGT: Oh, please! A few weeks after they talked, I asked PJ how he changed his OkCupid profile: VOGT: So generally the sense that I got from talking to him was that I came off as a flippant alcoholic. DUBNER: Which one?

DUBNER: Did you change photos? He told me to put in a picture of myself more presentable so I took a picture of myself from a wedding… DUBNER: Can I see?

And… what was your… it was a solo shot before… a little slacker-y… VOGT: Yeah, I also, I put a picture with my dog. VOGT: Yeah!

Hey podcast listeners. Before we get to that: Freakonomics Radio , as you may or may not know, is produced by the public-radio station WNYC — which means it is produced in part by you, our listeners.

So please click here to donate. Now, you may be thinking to yourself … Wait a minute. Okay, I want to tell you a story, about two people — Mandi Grzelak and Tim Barnhart.

Mandi, however, is a big fan of Freakonomics Radio. The very day she hears this episode, Mandi Grzelak decides to sign up for online dating. BARNHART: So we get the check and we walk out. And I get ready to walk her to her car.

I got in my 4 Runner, she got in her car. I started to drive off. And there was just this overwhelming urge to not pull out of the parking lot and, instead, pull up beside her car. I walked towards her and we both knew what was getting ready to happen. GRZELAK: It was a great first kiss. Tim proposed to Mandi. And she said yes. And then they got married — all because of Freakonomics Radio.

GRZELAK: I feel like we are forever thankful, because really I would not have gone online that night. I definitely would not have chosen the site that I did without hearing the podcast. Mandi and Tim: you are welcome. Our best wishes to the happy couple. Your money goes to WNYC which, in addition to producing Freakonomics Radio , makes great shows and podcasts like RadioLab ; Death, Sex, and Money ; On the Media , New Tech City , and many more. I will say this: the people who listen to Freakonomics Radio are famous around here for their high rate of giving.

So what are you waiting for? Join the crowd! Click here to donate and give us your money! Because without money, there is no Freakonomics Radio ; and without Freakonomics Radio , there is no love. And now, as promised, Episode No. REED: And I just moved to L. in August and got back on as a way to meet people, and get to know the city a little bit.

Reed is a comedy writer. She spent a lot of time on her OkCupid profile. Are they just looking at a picture? REED: Well, Aaron Carter is the younger brother of a Backstreet Boy who had a brief and ill-advised rap career. T here is just no substance there in his music at all. That was what I was trying to reflect in AaronCarterFan.

She wants to ruin your life. REED: To me, the worst person in the world is definitely racist. I needed that to be a part of her. I wanted her to be believably terrible.

REED: AaronCarterFan did very well. In the first 24 hours she got messages. I had the profile up for two or three weeks, and she got close to men message her. She got probably 10 times the number of messages that my real profile got.

I asked my friend Rae Johnston, who is an Australian-based model and actress, if I could raid her Facebook photos. She very kindly said yes. So Aaron Carter fan is stunningly good-looking. REED: Well, after so many messages started rolling, the optimist in me decided that these men had just seen the pretty photo and had not read her profile.

My goal at that point became to convince them that she is just awful, that she is the worst woman on earth. I would threaten to pull out their teeth. What are you doing on Friday? REED: I actually, believe it or not, did not want to meet any of these men in real life. Alli Reed wrote a fake OkCupid profile for a really good-looking year-old woman who also happened to be a racist, gold-digging, fake-pregnant-getting nightmare — and she got almost 1, replies.

Paul OYER: When men are deciding who to contact on dating sites, looks matter a great deal. An Illustration of the Pitfalls of Multiple Hypothesis Testing.

Now, why did Oyer suddenly turn his attention to online dating? And, more important, he realized, dating could be much improved if only everybody approached it like an economist would. Now, of course he would say that — he is an economist. But whoever you are, when it comes to online dating, it helps to start with some facts:. However, you will indirectly. A typical study will find that a person with one more year of education holding everything else equal makes 8 to 10 percent more than someone with one fewer year of education.

An overweight person who is otherwise medium attractive will do almost as well as a medium attractive person who is not overweight. OYER: Men, on the other hand, care a lot less about income.

They find that once you get out of this world into real relationships, relationships tend to be less stable and happy if the woman makes more money than the man.

So that makes sense that women should be more attracted to money than men to begin with. Okay, so Paul Oyer knows a good bit about the rules of attraction in online dating — which, if you think about it, is just dating with a much bigger pool and a much better filter.

In other words — is he any good at giving actual online dating advice? For instance: how do you build the best profile ever? Is it better to choose a big site like Match. com or a niche site like GlutenFreeSingles. com which is real? Should you lie — and if so, about what? And P. is a brave, brave soul — because he let us open up his OkCupid profile and pick it apart, on the radio:.

Vogt and Oyer sat down with Suzie Lechtenberg , a producer on our show. VOGT: Oh boy. VOGT: Okay, so it says what are you doing with your life? VOGT: Okay. I was pretending to know but I had no idea. VOGT: Yeah. VOGT: Oh, this is the worst part. What are we looking for here? Someone to hang out with? OYER: Okay, before we even look at it, the first thing an economist is going to do is think about supply and demand. New York City is demographically more female than male. We have an oversupply of men relative to women, at least compared to other cities.

New York City and Washington D. tend to swing much more towards more available women. Now the other thing to keep in mind here is time is very much on your side. You should be picky. You should be looking for a really good match. The reason for that is suppose you do find just the right person, get married, and live happily ever after. I should be searching a little less carefully. I should be settling. Settling is a very important idea to economists because of what we call search theory , [which] suggests that at some point you should realize that having what you have is better than expending more resources to try to do better.

So Paul Oyer is telling P. Vogt that P. is in pretty good shape, dating wise. VOGT: My friends and I talk about this all the time.

Posts Tagged ‘online dating’,Episode Transcript

 · Mar 22, A Freakonomics reader (we’ll call her “Sugar Baby”) is documenting her two-week experiment with online “Sugar Daddy Dating”: “beautiful women post pictures What You Don’t Know About Online Dating. Season 6, Episode 23 On this week’s episode of Freakonomics Radio: an economist’s guide to dating online. PJ Vogt bravely lets us AdFind Your Special Someone Online. Choose the Right Dating Site & Start Now!Whether its instant messaging, video chat, dating games, offline events, or online Date in Your Area · Dating Sites Comparison · Start Dating Online! · Meet Canadian SinglesTypes: All Ages Dating Sites, Senior Dating Sites, Gay Dating Sites  · Mandi, however, is a big fan of Freakonomics Radio. GRZELAK: I listened to the podcast on a Thursday morning on my way to work and it was titled “ What You Don’t Know ... read more

Men in New York and in cities where my friends live, everyone can actually feel these market forces and we talk about them. Can you guess which of our recent episodes changed the world? DUBNER: I mean…look… it is hard for me to say, but I would think if I were a woman and any guy who talked about…. And P. VOGT: Yes.

A few weeks after they talked, I asked Freakonomics online dating profile how he changed his OkCupid profile:. Here is a true story. I imagine this is true in other ethnic communities, freakonomics online dating profile. Alli Reed wrote a fake OkCupid profile for a really good-looking year-old woman who also happened to be a racist, gold-digging, fake-pregnant-getting nightmare — and she got almost 1, replies. REED: She — to me, the worst person in the world is definitely racist. Freakonomics Radio Network Newsletter Stay up-to-date on all our shows.

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